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LDB Welcomes New Law Clerks and Interns

June 12, 2017

 

Washington, D.C, June 12, 2017: The Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law (LDB) is pleased to announce its new summer team: Civil Rights Law Clerks Jennifer Kleinman and Jordan Weber, and interns Ali Rosenblatt and Michaela Shapiro.
Throughout the summer, LDB Clerks will conduct legal research and writing, while LDB’s interns will assist with communications and development, among other important tasks.

“It is a pleasure to welcome Jen, Jordan, Ali, and Michaela as they join our team,” says Kenneth L. Marcus, LDB President and General Counsel. “They will help greatly in our work combatting anti-Semitism.”

Jennifer is currently a rising second year law student at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, where she will serve as the President of the LDB Law school chapter on that campus. She holds a BA in Government and Counter-Terrorism from the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya. In between her studies, she has worked as a SAG and AFTRA accredited actress in Los Angeles, before beginning her career in the non-profit world. This career began when she worked as a Southwest Campus Coordinator for StandWithUs from 2012-2015. As the grandchild of Holocaust survivors, Jennifer says, “there is nothing more fulfilling and meaningful than fighting for equality, truth, and justice.” That is what brings her to the clerkship at LDB.

Jordan is also a rising second year law student at Emory, where he will serve as the President of the LDB Law school chapter on campus. He holds a BA in International Relations and Global studies from University of Texas – Austin, with a special interest in Human Rights and Social Justice. This led him to complete undergraduate research on Israeli ethnic policy and racial/religious politics in Western Europe. He took these interests and put them to work with the Anti-Defamation League in Austin. After graduating, he went on to work for the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas in Community Outreach and Legislative Affairs. Becoming a legal clerk for LDB this summer was just one more way for Jordan to work on ensuring human rights and social justice.

Ali is a rising Junior at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, majoring in Political Science and Sociology, with a sub-plan in Law, Justice and Social Change. She serves on the Central Student Government, last year as a Representative and this year as the Vice Speaker. She worked on the Communications Committee and served as the Social Media Director for a student government campaign, work that drew her to the communications internship. LDB stood out to her because, “it speaks up against anti-Semitism when few else do.” She is committed to speaking out and fighting against this, among all other forms of prejudice in higher education.

Michaela is a rising Senior at Northwestern University majoring in History, with a focus on European studies, and minoring in Psychology. She hopes to take on a fellowship after graduation working or teaching internationally. Next year, she will write her senior thesis in History, in addition to helping her History professor with archival research as a Leopold Fellow. Outside of her studies, she serves as the Vice President of Events for Relay for Life at Northwestern, the largest fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. She has long-admired LDB’s work and hopes to help push for policy changes. “The anti-Semitism, and hate crimes, that I’ve witnessed firsthand both on campus and abroad in France inspired me to work in the field of human rights,” Michaela said, “and I hope to utilize my passion for justice initiatives as a means of implementing concrete changes in legislation.”
LDB continues to grow. Jen, Jordan, Ali and Michaela will join Edward Kunzwho has been with LDB since January.
   


 
 
 
 
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If you are concerned about anti-Semitism on your campus, or if you seek advice about best practices, contact us.

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Research Articles
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Over 50% of Jewish American college students report that they experienced or witnessed anti-Semitism on their campuses during the 2013-2014 academic year. The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights has announced that campus anti-Semitism “is a serious problem which warrants further attention.” Campus anti-Semitism can include subjecting Jewish students to different treatment, harassment, violence or a hostile environment. In some cases, campus anti-Semitism is related to anti-Israel sentiment. In other cases, it is not. For most purposes, we define anti-Semitism according to the U.S. Department of State definition of anti-Semitism. .
 
 
 
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Adam S. Feuerstein
Adam S. Feuerstein is a Principal at PricewaterhouseCoopers and Adjunct Professor at Georgetown Law. His practice encompasses a broad range of transactional and tax planning matters.
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